ill-uminated CHAOs

Wet in flames.

All things poetry.

I find beauty in everything.

I fall in love frequently.

This is what my soul consists of.

ill-uminated CHAOs
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Q: Describe your perfect man in and out, gorgeous
Asked by godsonschronicles
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siensmagique:

I’m sorry… is this an ice cream sandwich made of sugar cones in waffle form. WHERE IS THIS PARADISE AND WHY AM I NOT EATING IT?????
When My Daughter Says it Was Her Fault
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"you have
parts of me
that will
always be
yours —
even if
you don’t
want them."
Kei, why missing you gets under my skin (via abluesforbrklyn)
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Who Thinks Your Thoughts?
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foodffs:

Pumpkin and Cream Cheese Muffins with Pecan Streusel

Really nice recipes. Every hour.


But these look so good
foodffs:

Pumpkin and Cream Cheese Muffins with Pecan Streusel

Really nice recipes. Every hour.


But these look so good
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colorthefuture:

"i wanted to do illmatic to leave my voice, my opinions, my philosophies, my ideas in music form, in rap form, as something that was proof that I was here" - Nas
moreso than any Hip-Hop project, Nas’ Illmatic takes seat at the head of Hip-Hop.
in a genre that’s slowly devolving into a lying contest, with extravagant boasts the rule rather than exception, Nasir Jones’ debut album will forever be the standard because it is an impeccable testimony of 20th century black life.
textbooks&documentaries will chronicle the social victories of our civil rights icons through the words of scholars &greying revolutionaries recalling a perilous time their resilience conquered….
but they may omit the crack era, the epilogue buoyed by freebase, a rudderless black infrastructure, &an apathetic (if not predatory) government that let it happen. it destroyed an entire generation. with multitudes in caskets &cells, who can tell that story?
not only was Illmatic an accurate account of that inner-city existence, Nas’ lyrical wizardry&sonic backdrop made it an incredible one.
impending doom pores through the sinister guitar riffs on “New York State of Mind” as Nas depicted a project shootout. the warm, haunting sample on “Memory Lane” sits in the belly like liquor as he recalls days of Queensbridge yore. the optimistic xylophones on “One Love” embody the silver-lined spirit of Nas’ letter to an imprisoned comrade.
the albums soundscape, jazzy melodies over coarse drums, synesthized a cold world within our world’s artistic capital, where hope&opportunity fleeted away from young minorities like tufts of wind in the Queens night.
from the lyrics to the production, that Time is Illmatic, which is why Erik Parker&One9 decided to celebrate it’s 20th anniversary with an aptly named documentary. consisting primarily of interviews with Nas, his brother Jungle &father (noted Jazz musician) Olu Dara, they recall Nas’ upbringing, as well as Hip-Hop’s in his native Queens to provide contextual backdrop for his opus.
Illmatic stands as a biography in itself, but the documentary succeeds in providing harrowing proof of just how perilous the pursuit of artistry can be. near the end of the film, which ran limited release in theaters throughout the country, a picture from the illmatic photoshoot (posted above) was highlighted. Nas was standing with several people in the photo&his brother, person by person, pointed out how many of them were now dead or in jail.
Nas was one of the very few from his time who received a modicum of success, who lived on to tell his story. many artists today feel hopeless in their journey for artistic success, but that desperation could only be compounded with the spectre of death or imprisonment looming.
Nas not only weathered the storm, but his artistry redefined the figurative conditions of black art. every credible Hip-Hop album past or present is compared to Illmatic as a barometer of quality, as a proper will &testament of existence. it’s inspiring.
Color the Future looks to spotlight the artists who define this time, who channel their existential emotion into art that will forever be testimony. Illmatic was iconic…we’re not necessarily anticipating the next, but we surely want to spotlight artists, who like Nas, froze frames of their life in art, who left proof of their existence, who’s art is time.
colorthefuture:

"i wanted to do illmatic to leave my voice, my opinions, my philosophies, my ideas in music form, in rap form, as something that was proof that I was here" - Nas
moreso than any Hip-Hop project, Nas’ Illmatic takes seat at the head of Hip-Hop.
in a genre that’s slowly devolving into a lying contest, with extravagant boasts the rule rather than exception, Nasir Jones’ debut album will forever be the standard because it is an impeccable testimony of 20th century black life.
textbooks&documentaries will chronicle the social victories of our civil rights icons through the words of scholars &greying revolutionaries recalling a perilous time their resilience conquered….
but they may omit the crack era, the epilogue buoyed by freebase, a rudderless black infrastructure, &an apathetic (if not predatory) government that let it happen. it destroyed an entire generation. with multitudes in caskets &cells, who can tell that story?
not only was Illmatic an accurate account of that inner-city existence, Nas’ lyrical wizardry&sonic backdrop made it an incredible one.
impending doom pores through the sinister guitar riffs on “New York State of Mind” as Nas depicted a project shootout. the warm, haunting sample on “Memory Lane” sits in the belly like liquor as he recalls days of Queensbridge yore. the optimistic xylophones on “One Love” embody the silver-lined spirit of Nas’ letter to an imprisoned comrade.
the albums soundscape, jazzy melodies over coarse drums, synesthized a cold world within our world’s artistic capital, where hope&opportunity fleeted away from young minorities like tufts of wind in the Queens night.
from the lyrics to the production, that Time is Illmatic, which is why Erik Parker&One9 decided to celebrate it’s 20th anniversary with an aptly named documentary. consisting primarily of interviews with Nas, his brother Jungle &father (noted Jazz musician) Olu Dara, they recall Nas’ upbringing, as well as Hip-Hop’s in his native Queens to provide contextual backdrop for his opus.
Illmatic stands as a biography in itself, but the documentary succeeds in providing harrowing proof of just how perilous the pursuit of artistry can be. near the end of the film, which ran limited release in theaters throughout the country, a picture from the illmatic photoshoot (posted above) was highlighted. Nas was standing with several people in the photo&his brother, person by person, pointed out how many of them were now dead or in jail.
Nas was one of the very few from his time who received a modicum of success, who lived on to tell his story. many artists today feel hopeless in their journey for artistic success, but that desperation could only be compounded with the spectre of death or imprisonment looming.
Nas not only weathered the storm, but his artistry redefined the figurative conditions of black art. every credible Hip-Hop album past or present is compared to Illmatic as a barometer of quality, as a proper will &testament of existence. it’s inspiring.
Color the Future looks to spotlight the artists who define this time, who channel their existential emotion into art that will forever be testimony. Illmatic was iconic…we’re not necessarily anticipating the next, but we surely want to spotlight artists, who like Nas, froze frames of their life in art, who left proof of their existence, who’s art is time.
colorthefuture:

"i wanted to do illmatic to leave my voice, my opinions, my philosophies, my ideas in music form, in rap form, as something that was proof that I was here" - Nas
moreso than any Hip-Hop project, Nas’ Illmatic takes seat at the head of Hip-Hop.
in a genre that’s slowly devolving into a lying contest, with extravagant boasts the rule rather than exception, Nasir Jones’ debut album will forever be the standard because it is an impeccable testimony of 20th century black life.
textbooks&documentaries will chronicle the social victories of our civil rights icons through the words of scholars &greying revolutionaries recalling a perilous time their resilience conquered….
but they may omit the crack era, the epilogue buoyed by freebase, a rudderless black infrastructure, &an apathetic (if not predatory) government that let it happen. it destroyed an entire generation. with multitudes in caskets &cells, who can tell that story?
not only was Illmatic an accurate account of that inner-city existence, Nas’ lyrical wizardry&sonic backdrop made it an incredible one.
impending doom pores through the sinister guitar riffs on “New York State of Mind” as Nas depicted a project shootout. the warm, haunting sample on “Memory Lane” sits in the belly like liquor as he recalls days of Queensbridge yore. the optimistic xylophones on “One Love” embody the silver-lined spirit of Nas’ letter to an imprisoned comrade.
the albums soundscape, jazzy melodies over coarse drums, synesthized a cold world within our world’s artistic capital, where hope&opportunity fleeted away from young minorities like tufts of wind in the Queens night.
from the lyrics to the production, that Time is Illmatic, which is why Erik Parker&One9 decided to celebrate it’s 20th anniversary with an aptly named documentary. consisting primarily of interviews with Nas, his brother Jungle &father (noted Jazz musician) Olu Dara, they recall Nas’ upbringing, as well as Hip-Hop’s in his native Queens to provide contextual backdrop for his opus.
Illmatic stands as a biography in itself, but the documentary succeeds in providing harrowing proof of just how perilous the pursuit of artistry can be. near the end of the film, which ran limited release in theaters throughout the country, a picture from the illmatic photoshoot (posted above) was highlighted. Nas was standing with several people in the photo&his brother, person by person, pointed out how many of them were now dead or in jail.
Nas was one of the very few from his time who received a modicum of success, who lived on to tell his story. many artists today feel hopeless in their journey for artistic success, but that desperation could only be compounded with the spectre of death or imprisonment looming.
Nas not only weathered the storm, but his artistry redefined the figurative conditions of black art. every credible Hip-Hop album past or present is compared to Illmatic as a barometer of quality, as a proper will &testament of existence. it’s inspiring.
Color the Future looks to spotlight the artists who define this time, who channel their existential emotion into art that will forever be testimony. Illmatic was iconic…we’re not necessarily anticipating the next, but we surely want to spotlight artists, who like Nas, froze frames of their life in art, who left proof of their existence, who’s art is time.
colorthefuture:

"i wanted to do illmatic to leave my voice, my opinions, my philosophies, my ideas in music form, in rap form, as something that was proof that I was here" - Nas
moreso than any Hip-Hop project, Nas’ Illmatic takes seat at the head of Hip-Hop.
in a genre that’s slowly devolving into a lying contest, with extravagant boasts the rule rather than exception, Nasir Jones’ debut album will forever be the standard because it is an impeccable testimony of 20th century black life.
textbooks&documentaries will chronicle the social victories of our civil rights icons through the words of scholars &greying revolutionaries recalling a perilous time their resilience conquered….
but they may omit the crack era, the epilogue buoyed by freebase, a rudderless black infrastructure, &an apathetic (if not predatory) government that let it happen. it destroyed an entire generation. with multitudes in caskets &cells, who can tell that story?
not only was Illmatic an accurate account of that inner-city existence, Nas’ lyrical wizardry&sonic backdrop made it an incredible one.
impending doom pores through the sinister guitar riffs on “New York State of Mind” as Nas depicted a project shootout. the warm, haunting sample on “Memory Lane” sits in the belly like liquor as he recalls days of Queensbridge yore. the optimistic xylophones on “One Love” embody the silver-lined spirit of Nas’ letter to an imprisoned comrade.
the albums soundscape, jazzy melodies over coarse drums, synesthized a cold world within our world’s artistic capital, where hope&opportunity fleeted away from young minorities like tufts of wind in the Queens night.
from the lyrics to the production, that Time is Illmatic, which is why Erik Parker&One9 decided to celebrate it’s 20th anniversary with an aptly named documentary. consisting primarily of interviews with Nas, his brother Jungle &father (noted Jazz musician) Olu Dara, they recall Nas’ upbringing, as well as Hip-Hop’s in his native Queens to provide contextual backdrop for his opus.
Illmatic stands as a biography in itself, but the documentary succeeds in providing harrowing proof of just how perilous the pursuit of artistry can be. near the end of the film, which ran limited release in theaters throughout the country, a picture from the illmatic photoshoot (posted above) was highlighted. Nas was standing with several people in the photo&his brother, person by person, pointed out how many of them were now dead or in jail.
Nas was one of the very few from his time who received a modicum of success, who lived on to tell his story. many artists today feel hopeless in their journey for artistic success, but that desperation could only be compounded with the spectre of death or imprisonment looming.
Nas not only weathered the storm, but his artistry redefined the figurative conditions of black art. every credible Hip-Hop album past or present is compared to Illmatic as a barometer of quality, as a proper will &testament of existence. it’s inspiring.
Color the Future looks to spotlight the artists who define this time, who channel their existential emotion into art that will forever be testimony. Illmatic was iconic…we’re not necessarily anticipating the next, but we surely want to spotlight artists, who like Nas, froze frames of their life in art, who left proof of their existence, who’s art is time.
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psych2go:

FACT/MYTH? FIND OUT HERE: Read More
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indiemusic-blog:

FKA Twigs (or Tahliah Debrett Barnett)